22.Sharp™ USA Knives Made By Colonial

Colonial made the knives and owned the trademark for Sharp™ USA. These knives were sold at Kmart stores across the USA from the late 1970’s through the mid 1990’s. Colonial did not make or own Sharp Japan.

These were stainless steel and marked as such on the package.Some were also marked Stainless on the tang. I believe them to be 420 but Colonial never advertised which stainless. Colonial used 420 for most of their stainless steel knives reserving their 440 for what they considered their higher end knives.

The Sharp knives were made on the anvil knives machines. So they were basically an Anvil knife with just a couple changes. Colonial would stamp the main blade with the Sharp tang stamp instead of Anvil.Then they used the Colonial Stagalon handles instead of the Anvil handles.

Below are some pictures of Sharp knives.

Here is a Model 380 which Colonial called the Trapper. This one is still in the original clam pack from 1992.

 

colonial-sharp-usa-380-in-cp

 

colonial-sharp-usa-380-in-cp-2

Here are a couple I have. A model 380 and a little moose peanut with a blade marked 260.

 

colonial-sharp-knives

 

colonial-sharp-knives-3

 

colonial-sharp-knives-2

 

There is some confusion when it comes to identifying these different models. There is a number stamped on the main blades that is the model number. The problem with relying on that number comes from something Colonial did in the 90s when things were not going very well for them.

Colonial would go through the warehouse and find knives to assemble using parts from different models or even lines. Many sharp knives used the exact same blades other than the model number stamped on the tang. They were just configured differently. So you could take the frame from a 260 or 280 and use a main blade marked 270 and it would come out the same other than the number.

So at this point the only model number I know for sure is the 380 because its the only one I have seen in original packaging.

Remember what I said about Sharp being made on Anvil machines?

There must have been quite a bit of Sharp parts sitting around because I even have a knife that is mostly Anvil other than a Sharp 380 main blade.

Here it is with a Sharp 380 for comparison.

 

colonial-anvil-and-sharp-380-1

 

colonial-anvil-and-sharp-380-4

 

colonial-anvil-and-sharp-380-2

 

colonial-anvil-and-sharp-380-3

 

I also have an old Colonial model #426 peanut that was made in the early 1960s. It has the solid nickle silver bolsters used before Colonial went to the pressed on bolsters. Its shape is the same as Anvil and Sharp so I though it would make an interesting picture for this thread as well with how similar it is.

 

colonial-and-sharp-peanuts

 

 

 

21.The Combined Pocket Knife Fishing Rod Handle

Now this is an interesting patent.

Most of Colonials inventions were patented by Antonio Paolantonio, this time it was Alfonso F. Paolantonio that received the patent for Colonial.

Patent #3,312,989 was filed July 6, 1965 and was approved on April 11,1967. The patent was called a combined pocket knife fishing rod handle by Colonial.

This invention was a fishing rod where the bottom of the handle was a pocket knife. You could remove the knife and use it like any other knife. Then put it back on the rod.

Other than the illustration accompanying the patent no pictures are known to exist. If anyone ever comes across one of these, even a picture please let me know.

 

The typos and mis spelled words below are exactly as they appear in the real patent paperwork.

 
Alfonso F. Paolantonio had this to say about his invention.

” This invention relates to a combined pocket knife and rod handle, such for instance as for the reception of a fishing rod.

The invention comprises the utilization of the springs of a folding blade pocket knife for providing a means for holding a clutch to detachably receive a fishing rod by reason of the provision of means extending lengthwise of the spring beyond the knife for this purpose.

An object of the invention is to provide a simple means of providing a clutch for detachably gripping a rod so that the handle of the knife may serve the purpose of the handle for the rod as well as the handle for the knife.

Another object of the invention is to provide a combination tool which will be of simple and inexpensive construction and yet one “which will have a plurality of functions.

With these and other objects in view, the invention consists of certain novel features of construction as will be more fully described and particularly pointed out in the appended claims.”
Below is the patent paperwork for this invention.

April 1967 A. F. PAOLANTONIO 3,312,989

COMBINED POCKET KNIFE AND ROD HANDLE Filed July 6, 1965 ni 6 /9 i 5 5 INVENTOR.

ALFONSO F. PAOLANTONIO ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,312,989 COMBINED POCKET KNIFE AND ROD HANDLE Alfonso F. Paolantonio, Providence, R.I., assignor to ICiflonial Knife Company, Inc., a corporation of Rhode s and Filed July 6, 1965, Ser. No. 469,411 2 Claims. (Cl. 7-11) This invention relates to a combined pocket knife and rod handle, such for instance as for the reception of a fishing rod.

The invention comprises the utilization of the springs of a folding blade pocket knife for providing a means for holding a clutch to detachably receive a fishing rod by reason of the provision of means extending lengthwise of the spring beyond the knife for this purpose.

An object of the invention is to provide a simple means of providing a clutch for detachably gripping a rod so that the handle of the knife may serve the purpose of the handle for the rod as well as the handle for the knife.

Another object of the invention is to provide a combination tool which will be of simple and inexpensive construction and yet one “which will have a plurality of functions.

With these and other objects in view, the invention consists of certain novel features of construction as will be more fully described and particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a pocket knife with a clutch secured to the end thereof and the fragmental portion of a rod engaged by the clutch;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the structure of FIG. 1 with the rod omitted; and

FIG. 3 is a sectional view substantially on line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

The knife portion of this invention comprises lining plates 10 and 11 with an intermediate plate 12 all held in spaced relation by reason of the provision between these plates of springs 14 and 15. A cover extends along the outer surface of the lining plates 10 and 11 as at 16 and 17, while there are bolsters 18 and 19 at one end of both covers. The lining plates, intermediate plate and covers are held together at one end of the assembly by a rivet 20 which extends through the portion 21 of the springs to fixedly hold the springs at this end and the other parts above mentioned in assembled relation. A second rivet 22 spaced about midway of the knife also extends through the lining plates, intermediate plate, and

3,312,939 Patented. Apr. 11, 1967 springs and cover to hold these parts assembled. The springs, however, at their opposite end are left free as at 23 in FIG. 3, while a rivet 24 extends through the cover, intermediate plates, and knife blades 25 and 26 to pivotally mount these blades, these blades being held in closed position as shown, or in open position by reason of the springs extending along surfaces 29 or 30 thereof.

Each of the springs 14 and 15 is provided with an arm 27 and 28 which extends lengthwise of the springs outwardly beyond the lining plates and cover. Upon these arms there may be assembled a clutch which comprises a sleeve 31 of a size to closely fit the arms 27 and 28 and may be fixed thereon by striking the sleeve to indent it inwardly as at 32 (see FIG. 3) to clamp it tightly upon the arms. This sleeve has integral with it and extending beyond its outer end two jaws 33 and 34 which may be threaded as at 35 so that, when the nut 36 is screwed I onto this threaded portion, the taper 37 of the nut will engage the jaws contract them for gripping a rod such as 38 when positioned into these jaws.

I claim:

1. A combined implement of the class described, hav ing a handle comprising spaced plates, spring means be tween said plates, pins extending through said plates and spring means fixing one end of the spring means with reference to said plates, the other end of the spring means being free and movable with reference to said plates, said spring means at its fixed end having arm means of the same piece of material projecting in a direction lengthwise of the plates beyond the plates, a sleeve receiving said arm means in one end portion and split to provide a plurality of jaws at the other end thereof and means for contracting said jaws.

2. A combined implement as in claim 1 wherein said jaws have external threads, and said contracting means comprises a ferrule threaded onto said jaws for contracting said jaws.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 719,275 1/1903 Swan 27942 X 1,368,944 2/ 1921 Kurose 715 1,456,844 5/1923 De Bie 7-11 2,430,638 11/1947 Hoffman 711 X 3,034,798 5/1962 Portz 279-42 WILLIAM FELDMAN, Primary Examiner.

G. WEIDENFELD, Assistant Examiner.

 

 

us3312989-0

20. The Shell Knife Patent

Patent #2,310,648 was applied for on Nov. 25th 1942 and the patent was approved on February 9th 1943.

Colonial called this patent a Knife Handle Patent.

The resulting knife became known as a shell knife. A shell knife was made by completing the inside of the knife first and adding the handle as one of the last steps in the process. The inside was called the skeleton. It was the frame of the knife, fully assembled with blades and springs and it just needed a handle attached to be finished. The handle had little tabs on it and it could be attached very quickly by just sticking the handle on and bending the tabs down.

There were many benefits to this way of making knives.

Selling knife skeletons to other company’s who would make their own handles and sell the completed knives. There was a huge jewelry industry in Providence, Rhode Island and was a big part of the reason so many knife company’s were in Rhode Island. Selling knife skeletons or very basic completed knives to jewelers so they could fancy them up with jewels or engraving and re sell them. A pocket watch with a nice knife at the end of the watch chain was a very popular thing at the time.
It also really sped things up at the Colonial Knife factory. Not only could they make knives so much faster than ever before but they could make the skeletons and many different kinds of handles ahead of time and store them until an order was received. Then it was a very quick process to assemble whichever style of knife and handles the customer ordered.

I believe this patent and later the new bolster patent were pivotal in Colonial becoming one of the largest manufactures of pocket knives in the USA.

Colonial knives dont have the best of reputations among some the knife world. Especially the shell knives. It seems to be a love them or hate them kind of thing. Honestly the handles do have a tendency to come loose and rattle around on some models. The shells with one tab on each end seems to be worse than the ones with tabs in the middle under the handles in my experience. So there are people who wont have anything to do with them and then there are the people like me who love them because they are such a neat reminder of the way things used to be. These knives take many of us back to our childhoods.

I also would like to point out that these shell knives were a cheaper model of knife. Colonial also made Ranger, Anvil and Old Cutler which were a much higher class of knife if thats what you wanted to pay for.

Back then cheap import knives were not around and Colonial provided a much wanted low priced knife. Colonial sold so many of these shell knives that Camillus brought out a lower priced line of knives just to compete with Colonial. At the time the average Camillus knife sold for $4. Colonials shell knives were $1. So Camillus found a way to lower costs by using the same high quality blades and springs they normally used but cheaper, more basic handle materiels and cutting out some stuff like shields and bails. Camillus called that line Camco and it sold for $1 just like the Colonial.

So clearly the main reason Colonial came up with this invention was for easier, faster knife manufacturing. They also claimed that the cover would be more securely held in place providing a more rigid handle that would not only be more durable in use but would have a more attractive appearance. Now that I dont agree with

Here is how Antonio Paolantonio explained his invention.
“In the use of pocket knives it has been known to provide a cover for the handle part of the knife by wrapping a piece of thin, flexible material such as Celluloid about the shell which is attached to the frame plate and securing this flexible material by tucking the edges beneath the shell plate and binding the edges in position upon assembly of the shell. In many instances such as due to different climatic conditions, the cover would slide or raise at its end, and difficulty was experienced in holding the cover in this form in place.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide a cover which will be more securely held in place and one which does not rely upon a gripping relation between the shell and the frame for holding the cover in position.

Another object of this invention is to provide an arrangement for securing a cover to the shell prior to the assembly of the shell on the knife frame.

Another object of the invention is to provide a knife handle of more attractive appearance and more rigid and durable in use.

With these and other objects in view, the invention consists of certain novel features of construction, as will be more fully described and particularly pointed out in the appended claims.”
Below is the actual patent information.
KNIFE Filed Nov. 25, 1942 INVENTOR – ATTORNEYS Patented Feb. Q, 1943 KNIFE Antonio Paclantonio, Providence, R. 1., assignor to Colonial Knife of Rhode Island Company, Inc., a corporation Application November 23, 1942, Serial No. 466,574 6 Claims. (Cl. 30-164) This invention relates to a knife, more particularly the handle of a pocket knife.

In the use of pocket knives it has been known to provide a cover for the handle part of the knife by wrapping a piece of thin, flexible material such as Celluloid about the shell which is attached to the frame plate and securing this flexible material by tucking the edges beneath the shell plate and binding the edges in position upon assembly of the shell. In many instances such as due to different climatic conditions, the cover would slide or raise at its end, and difliculty was experienced in holding the cover in this form in place.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide a cover which will be more securely held in place and one which does not rely upon a gripping relation between the shell and the frame for holding the cover in position.

Another object of this invention is to provide an arrangement for securing a cover to the shell prior to the assembly of the shell on the knife frame.

Another object of the invention is to provide a knife handle of more attractive appearance and more rigid and durable in use.

With these and other objects in view, the invention consists of certain novel features of construction, as will be more fully described and particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawing:

Fig. 1 is a top plan view of a jackknife in which the invention is embodied;

Fig. 2 is a, view similar to Fig. 1 but showing the frame and blade of the knife alone;

Fig. 3 is a top plan view showing the shell and its bolsters with the cover attached;

Fig. 4 is a section on line 4 l of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view illustrating the frame and blades of the knife with one shell of the handle secured in position and omitting the shell of the handle on the opposite side;

Fig. 6 is a section on line 66 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 7 is a top plan view of the shell alone, omitting the cover;

Fig. 8 is a central section of Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 is a top plan view of the flexible cover;

Fig. 10 is a top plan of the binding member.

In proceeding with this invention I have used the same thin, flexible, ornamental cover material such as thin Celluloid and of a sufficient width to tuck under the shell to a sufficient extent to be secured by an independent added binding member which I have provided and which metallic binding member itself may be secured by means of prongs to the shell.

With reference to the drawing, Fig. 2 shows the frame ofthe knife, designated generally l5, with blades l6 and I! fitting between the frame plates I8 which are assembled with a spring bar in a known manner and provided with spacers l9. Notches 2B are provided at each end of the frame plate I8 for the assembly of the shell therewith.

The shell is designated generally 2| and is shown alone in Figs. 7 and 8. It is pressed from sheet stock to provide bolsters 22 at either end thereof which are equipped with tabs 23 to fold through the notches 26 and lodge in the recesses 24 in the plate I 8 (see Fig. 5). These bolsters are connected by a strip of material 25 which is concave-convex (see Fig. 6) and is provided with prongs 26 cut from the stock thereof and located in spaced relation as shown in Figs. 4 and 8. This strip 25 sets below the bolsters so as to provide shoulders 21 between this strip and the bolsters as shown in Figs. 7 and 8.

The cover, designated generally 30, consists of Celluloid or other flexible material, which is folded about the convex surface of the member 25 and by sharply folding and fixing by such folding the edges of this sheet 34, the edges are located beneath the shell. This ornamental material 38 thus covers the openings formed by cutting and bending down of the prongs 26. The flexible material is held firmly to the shell by a binding member 3| (see Fig. 10) having openings 32 through which the prongs 26 extend to be bent over the surface of the member 3| and hold it firmly against the under side of the shell to bind the edges 33 of the cover material against the under side of the shell and between the binding member 3| and the shell.

In this manner the cover may be assembled upon the shell prior to the securing of the shell to the knife frame and the cover is firmly held in position on the shell between the bolsters and cannot ride up over the bolsters by reason of the shoulders and the secured attachment of the flexible material to its reinforcing member. It is unnecessary that the tabs 23 be strong or that the shell be so strong as to act as a means for binding a cover member in place. Further the binding member may be made sufiiciently heavy to reinforce the shell and make a strong handle.

I claim:

1. In a knife having spaced plates providing the frame thereof, a shell secured to said frame, a cover over said shell with its edge portions extending over the edges of the shell and beneath the same, said cover comprising a sheet of thin, flexible material and a binding member on the under side of the shell and secured thereto.

2. In a, knife having spaced plates providing the frame thereof, a shell secured to said frame and provided with bolsters at each end, a cover over said shell between said bolsters with its edge portions extending over the edges of the shell and beneath the same, said cover comprising a sheet of thin, flexible material and a binding member on the under side of the shell and secured thereto for binding the edge portions of the cover in position.

3. In a knife having spaced plates providing the frame thereof, a shell secured to said frame, a cover over said shell with its edge portions extending over the edges of the shell and beneath the same, said cover comprising a sheet of thin, flexible material and a, binding member on the under side of the shell and prongs on said shell engaging said member for binding the edge portions of said cover in position.

4. In a, knife having spaced plates providing the frame thereof, a shell secured to said frame and provided with bolsters at each end, a cover over said shell between said bolsters with its edge portions extending over the edges of the shell and beneath the same, said cover comprising a sheet of thin, flexible material and a binding member on the under side of the shell and prongs on said shell engaging said member for binding the edge portions of said cover in posi- 5. A scale for a knife comprising a shell having the end portions thereof in the form of bolsters, a cover located between said bolsters comprising a thin, flexible material extending over the edges of the shell and beneath the same and a binding member on the under side of the shell and means to attach the member to the shell to bind the cover material in position and tabs at the end portions of said shell for attaching the same to the frame of a knife.

6. A scale for a knife comprising a shell having the end portions thereof in the form of bolsters, a cover located between said bolsters comprising a thin, flexible material extending over the edges of the shell and beneath the same and a binding member on the under side of the shell and attached thereto to bind the cover material in position.

ANTONIO PAOLANTONIO.

 

 

colonial-patent-us2310648-0

 

Below are a couple of my shell knives I removed the handles from to show the skeletons.

shell-knives-covers-off

 

The tabs that are folded over to hold the handles on can be seen in the picture below.

shell-knife-tabs

19. The Bolster Patent

Colonials knife bolster assembly patent is for an interesting way of making knives.

Patent # 3,317,996 was applied for on July 6th 1965 by Antonio Paolantonio. It was approved on May 9th 1967.

It allowed the bolsters to be added to the knife as one of the last steps in making it. The bolsters had a pin sticking out on the inside and it was pressed into a hole in the frame of the knife securing it. Colonials reason for this was to make it faster and easier to make knives as well as looking better because you cant see a pin through the bolster.

Colonial designed a machine that installed 2 bolsters at the same time. An operator would sit at the machine and  put a bolster on each end of the knife then pull a lever and boom, the machine came down and pressed both bolster in place at once. Flip the knife, add 2 more bolsters and a lever pull, boom. Bolsters finished and the knife was off for final sharpening and polishing.

 

Here is how Antonio Paolantonio explains his invention.
“This invention relates to a knife, more particularly a pocket knife, and more especially to the assembly of a bolster at one end of the knife.

Heretofore, it has been customary to assemble the bolster on the liner plate and then secure the bolstered liner plates, springs, and pivoted blades together by passing a pin completely through the bolster and riveting it over the outer surface of the bolster.

This invention provides the assembly of the bolster as nearly the last operation and secures the bolster without a pin extending completely through both bolsters by utilizing a recess in the cover for the liner plate and a heading over of a projection which passes only through the liner plate and does not pass through the springs. Thus the bolster may be positioned as nearly a last operation after the remainder of the knife is assembled.

One of the objects of the invention is to provide an assembly so that there is no need for piercing the bolster or the passing of a securing pin therethrough.

Another object of the invention is to provide a construction so that the bolster may be assembled as substantially a last operation and hide the rivet which holds the remainder of the knife assembled.

Another object of the invention is to eliminate the grinding of the tips of the pin which heretofore was used to secure the bolster in position.”

Below are the original patents.
United States Patent Office 3,317,995 Patented May 9, 1967 3,317,996 KNIFE BQLSTER ASSEMBLY Antonio Paolantonio, Johnston, RI, assignor to Colonial Knife Company, Inc, a corporation of Rhode Island Filed July 6, 1965, Ser. No. 469,431 3 Claims. (Cl. 30-164) This invention relates to a knife, more particularly a pocket knife, and more especially to the assembly of a bolster at one end of the knife.

Heretofore, it has been customary to assemble the bolster on the liner plate and then secure the bolstered liner plates, springs, and pivoted blades together by passing a pin completely through the bolster and riveting it over the outer surface of the bolster.

This invention provides the assembly of the bolster as nearly the last operation and secures the bolster without a pin extending completely through both bolsters by utilizing a recess in the cover for the liner plate and a heading over of a projection which passes only through the liner plate and does not pass through the springs. Thus the bolster may be positioned as nearly a last operation after the remainder of the knife is assembled.

One of the objects of the invention is to provide an assembly so that there is no need for piercing the bolster or the passing of a securing p-in therethrough.

Another object of the invention is to provide a construction so that the bolster may be assembled as substantially a last operation and hide the rivet which holds the remainder of the knife assembled.

Another object of the invention is to eliminate the grinding of the tips of the pin which heretofore was used to secure the bolster in position.

With these and other objects in view, the invention consists of certain novel features of construction as will be more fully described and particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a pocket knife with my bolster in position thereon;

FIG. 2 is an elevation with parts assembled except for the bolster;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of the parts shown in FIG. 3;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the bolster looking at the underside; and

FIG. 5 is a sectional fragmental view showing the manner of assembling the bolster in position on the liner plate with the parts greatly enlarged.

The knife here shown comprises liner plates and 11 with an intermediate plate at 12 between the two liner plates. Springs 14 and 15 separate the intermediate plate from the two liner plates and are secured in position at one end of the knife by a riveting pin 16 headed over as at 17 and 18 against the outer surface of the liner plates and passing through the intermediate plate and the springs. Prior to the assembly of the liner plates with the springs, the liner plates are equipped with covers 20 and 21 by reason of rivets 22 passing through the covers and the liner plate. As a further assembly of the liner plates with their covers and the springs, there is a rivet 23 which passes through the covers, liner plate, intermediate plate and springs securing the springs in fixed position. The opposite ends of the springs are left free, but there is a pin 24 which passes through the blades of the knife 25 and 26 pivoting them so that they are held in closed position or in open position when swung out from between the liner plates and intermediate plates against the action of the spring.

The covers 20 and 21 do not extend the full length of the liner plates, and the knife as thus far described would leave showing the heads of the rivet pins 16 and 24. These heads and the ends of the liner plates are covered with the bolsters which in each case comprises a solid body 30 with a finger 31 extending from the edge thereof which is to be adjacent the end of the cover. The cover is recessed as at 33 (FIG. 5) for the reception of this finger 31, while the bolster is also recessed as at 34 for the reception of the head of the rivet such as 17 or 18. A proturberance 35 extending from the inner surface of the bolster is also received in a hole 36 in the liner plate. Thus, after the knife is assembled as above described, the bolster may be assembled by inclining the bolster at an angle to the liner plate (FIG. 5) where there is a hole 37 to receive it and then swinging the bolster so that the finger 31 extends into the recess 33, while the protuberance 35 will enter the opening 36 in the liner plate. The protuberance 35 may by reason of its engagement with the springs 14, 15 at the fixed end of the springs or some jig at the opposite end, when struck from the outer surface will cause the protuberance 35 to head over or rivet itself in the flared part 39 of the opening 36 so as to firmly secure the bolster in position. By reason of this sort of assembly, the bolster may be positioned near the end of the assembly operation with no need for grinding off pins to hold it in position and no need of providing a hole in the bolster for the reception of such pins, thus providing a smooth unmarred outer surface of the bolster and yet one which is held securely in position.

I claim:

1. In a knife a liner plate having an opening adjacent one end, a rivet having a head that retains the plate in assembled position and said rivet is adjacent said opening, a cover over a portion of said liner plate terminating in an edge short of said rivet head, said terminating portion having an undercut pocket in the edge thereof extending from the edge away from said rivet head, a bolster secured on the uncovered end of said plate having a finger extending into said pocket and a protuberance extending into said opening in said plate and locked therein by having a riveted end.

2. In a knife as in claim 1, said bolster having on its inner surface a recess to receive said rivet head.

3. In a knife as in claim 1 wherein said rivet head extends above said liner plate and said liner plate has a second opening adjacent said pocket permitting said bolster finger to enter said second opening and be swung into position into said pocket.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 449,499 3/1891 Schmachtenberg 30l55 850,420 4/1907 Cooper et al. 30164 FOREIGN PATENTS 906,054 1/ 1954 Germany.

WILLIAM FELDMAN, Primary Examiner.

G. WEIDENFELD, Assistant Examiner.

 

old-cutler-bolster-patent

 

Below are some pictures of Colonial knives I have with the pressed on bolsters. These knives were never finished being assembled so you can see very well how they worked. These came from the Colonial auction in 2002.

 

colonial-unfinished-bolsters-2colonial-unfinished-bolsters

 

 

 

18.The Tip Knife Patent

The picture below is a Colonial tip knife from the 1940s.

Colonial Green Jack Knife X

Many company’s made tip knives but Colonial held the patent.

Patented by Antonio Paolantonio. U.S. Patent # 2,264,453

This patent was filed for on January 27, 1940 and approved on December 2, 1941.

I believe Colonial made and sold tip knives for many years before applying for the patent.

I have tip knives made by Colonial with curved tang stamps that are known to be made between 1926 and 1938.

A tip knife has no solid bolsters at each end like a lot of knives at the time. There were small hollow bolsters connected to each end of the metal plates in the body of the knife. The skeleton of the knife could be assembled and stored and a celluloid handle attached later when ordered.

So basically Colonial said the benefits of this knife were ease of assembly, stronger than other knives of its type and it looked better to hide the rivets in this way.

Here is exactly how they said that.

“This invention has for one of its objects to provide a more rugged and stronger hinged mounting of the knife blade than heretofore provided in a knife of this character.”
“Another object of the invention is to conceal the rivets which are usually provided for holding the cover upon a knife.”

“Another object of the invention is to provide an arrangement whereby the cover sections will be assembled after the metallic portion of the knife is all assembled in relation so that the main body portion of the knife may be made up ahead of time and then covers assembled on the body portion of the knife in accordance with the choice of the customer to whom they were furnished.”

“Another object of the invention is to conceal the rivets which are usually provided for holding the cover upon a knife.The rivets are somewhat unsightly, especially as they sharply contrast with the color of the cover section”

 

 

 

 

Below I will be adding the original patent and Antonio Paolantonio’s description and drawings of his invention.I will also add pictures of Colonial tip knives from my collection.

There are many typos, misspelled words and other weird things like funny old words included in the original patent. I edited some that were confusing while leaving the ones that weren’t as bad because I think it is interesting.
This is from the original patent.

Filed Jan. 27, 1940

Patented Dec. 2, 1941 For Antonio Paolantonio, Johnston, R. I., assignor to Colonial Knife Company, Inc., a corporation of Rhode Island 11 Claims.

This invention relates to a knife of the character often referred to as a tip knife; that is, one in which there are no bolsters at the ends of a size adapted
to receive rivets therethrough; and this invention has for one of its objects to provide a more rugged and stronger hinged mounting of the knife blade than
heretofore provided in a knife of this character.

Another object of the invention is to conceal the rivets which are usually provided for holding the cover upon a knife.

A further object of the invention is to provide a knife in which the cover sections may be held against separating from the metallic plate or scale portions
over which they extend.

Another object of the invention is to provide an arrangement whereby the cover sections will be assembled after the metallic portion of the knife is all
assembled in relation so that the main body portion of the knife may be made up ahead of time and then covers assembled on the body portion of the knife in
accordance with the choice of the customer to whom they were furnished.

With these and other objects in view, the invention consists of certain novel features of construction as will be more fully described and particularly pointed
out in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawing:

Fig. l is an elevation of the knife completed;

Fig. 2 is a top plan view thereof; v

Fig. 3 is an elevation of the body portion of the knife with the cover removed;

Fig. 4 is a top plan View thereof;

Fig. 5 is a section on line 5 5 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 6 is a section on line 6-6 of Fig. 3;

Fig. ‘7 is a sectional View through one of the plates or scale portions of the knife; n

Fig. 8 is an elevation of one of the cover sections;

Fig. cover;

Fig. is a sectional View on substantially line Ill-l0 of Fig. 3, illustrating one of the cover sections
assembled and another of the cover sections in one of the positions which it assumes in being moved to
assembled position;

Fig. 1l is a sectional view on line II-II of Fig. 10.

Folding knives of the so-called tip type in which there are no bolsters of a size to receive rivets there
through usually have the rivets extending through the covers which extend along the scale or outer plates of the
knife body whereby the rivets hold the knife body as well as a cover in assembled relation. The covers are usually of Celluloid or
some non-metallic material which is rather soft and the rivet heads which engage these softer cover portions will permit of some relative
movement of the assembled parts if some pressure is brought to bear upon the knife blade which is pivoted upon the end rivets of such assembly.

Further,
the rivets are somewhat unsightly, especially as they sharply contrast with the color of the cover section; and again,
when knives are formed up in the above-mentioned manner, the covers are a part of the complete assembly and cannot be
easily changed if a different colored cover is desired.

Accordingly, in order to provide a stronger construction I have riveted the metal parts of the knife together as a unit body
and have assembled the cover so as to conceal these rivets; the cover being assembled `as a separate operation enables the body
to be made up and the covers assembled as a last operation whereby a large number of bodies maybe made up without covers, and the
covers assembled thereon as a last operation in accordance with the orders for various colors which may be received, thus enabling
a large part of the assembly operations to be performed ahead of time and minimizing the carrying of stock upon manufacturers
shelves.

I further provide for the better holding of the cover in position by welding the opposite covers together against the metallic
scales of the knife; and the following is a more detailed description of the present embodiment of the invention, illustrating the
preferred means by which these advantageous results may be accomplished:

With reference to the drawing, Ill designates a center plate and II, outer plates or scales spaced ,from the center plate Il] by
spacers I2 and I3. These spacers also serve as resilient or spring portions for assisting in holding the knife blades I4 and VI5 in different adjusted positions.

The knife blades I 4 and I5 are pivoted upon a rivet I6 which extends through the plates and blades to hingedly mount the blades
between the plates and also engages the end of each blade so as to hold the bladein either closed or open position in a usual manner.
The rivet Il extends through the plates and spacer at the opposite end of the knife and is headed over the metallic plates so as to hold them firmly in assembled relation. kThe hollow rivet also extends through the plates and spacer atsuboutwardly to open
position, even though there is considerable lateral stress brought to bear upon v the blade, the portions which embrace the pivot rivet
i6 are well supported against spreading by the blades by reason of such pressure.

This unit assembly so far described may be made up ahead of time or in quantities, leaving the cover sections which are now to be described
to be later assembled.

Each of the scales or plates ii consists of a sheet of stock in which the tip ends i9 are split and raised as at 2G so as to provide openings
2i beneath these tip portions. The cover, riesig nated generally 22, shown in Fig. 8, is formed of non-metallic material such, for instance, as
Celluloid, although any moldable material which is somewhat flexible may be provided.This cover section is molded with fingers 23 at either end
and a projecting portion 24 at its middle point which will be in such position that it may extend into the hollow rivet i8 above referred to.

These cover sections will be of Various colors and will be assembled onto the body of the knife in the color ordered by iiexing to draw the fingers 23 at the
ends toward each other a distance sufiiicient to project them into the slots 2i in the scale and beneath the tips and then releasing to permit these sections
to move back into a straightened position and by such straightening cause the fingers 23 to extend beneathf heat the knife at this location so that
a welding v of the ends 26 of the projections li may occur, or I may so moisten the end portions of the projections 24 with a solvent that they will become
softened and upon pressure forcing these two tips together, they will become welded for effectively becoming a single piece extending through the rivet i8. One such
solvent which may be used for Celluloid is acetone.

In this manner, when the portions 24 become dried and hardened, the two cover sections will be held against movement apart or separation, and
not withstanding changes
in temperature which often affect Celluloid, the cover sections will be held firmly against the scales or plates Il and against separation or release
therefrom, While at the same time covering the rivets making a more sightly appearance and enabling the rivets to engage the metal surfaces to better hold
the parts against stresses which may occur.

The foregoing description is directed solely towards the construction illustrated, but I desire it to be understood that I reserve the privilege of resorting to all
the mechanical changes to which the device is susceptible.

I claim:

1. In a tip knife, a plurality of metal plates, a spacer between said plates, rivets extending through said plates and headed over in contact with said plates, a
non-metallic cover over said rivets hiding the same from View, means to secure said cover in said assembled position, one of said rivets being hollow, and said
cover being provided with a non-metallic projection extending well into said hollow rivet.

2. In a tip knife a plurality of metal plates, a spacer between said plates, rivets extending through said plates and headed over in contact with said plates, non-metallic covers over said rivets hiding the same from View, means to secure said covers in said assembled position, one of said rivets being hollow, and means extending through said hollow rivet from opposite sides thereof to lock the covers together against outward movement.

3. In a tip knife, a plurality of metal plates, a spacer between said plates, rivets extending through said plates and headed over in contact with said plates, non-metallic covers over said rivets hiding the same from view, means to secure said cover in said assembled position, one of said rivets being hollow, said covers being each provided with
a projection to extend into said hollow rivet from opposite sides thereof and said projections being secured together.

4. The method of securing a non-metallic cover on a knife which consists in molding the cover in side sections with a projection on each section and welding said projections
together through the knife to hold the opposite sections on each side of the knife.

5. In a tip knife, a pair of outer metal plates, a spacer between said plates, rivets extending through said plates and headed over in contact with said plates to provide a unitary assembly,

and non-metallic covers on opposite sides of said riveted assembly over said rivets hiding the same from View, said covers being integrally connected to each other by non-metallic material extending through said riveted assembly.

6. In a tip knife, a pair of outer metal plates, a spacer between said plates, rivets extending through said plates and headed over in contact with said plates to provide a unitary assembly, non-metallic covers on opposite sides of said riveted assembly over said rivets hiding the same from view, and means carried by eachplate to secure one of said covers in assembled relation thereto, said covers being integrally connected to each other by non-metallic material extending through said riveted assembly.

‘7. In a tip knife, a pair of outer metal plates each having each end portion thereof provided with a hollow integral outer tip with an opening
extending thereinto, rivets securing said f plates in assembled relation, and a cover over said rivets and having end projections formed of the stock of the cover extending through said openings into said tips to assist in holding the cover over said plate.

8. In a tip knife, a pair of outer metal plates, each having each end portion thereof provided with a hollow integral outer tip with an opening extending thereinto, rivets securing said plates in assembled relation, a cover over said rivets with the ends thereof extending through said opening into said tips to assist in holding the cover over said plate, one of said rivets being hollow, and said cover being provided with a projection formed of the same material as the cover and extending into said hollow rivet.

9. In a tip knife, a pair of outer metal plates, each having each end portion thereof provided with a hollow integral outer tip with an opening extending
thereinto, rivets securing said plates in assembled relation, a cover over said rivets with the ends thereof extending through said opening into said tips
to assist in holding the cover over said plates, one of said rivets being hollow, and non-metallic means extending wholly through said hollow rivet and fast to
each cover to lock the covers together against outward movement.

10. In a tip knife, a pair of outer metal plates, each having each end portion provided with a hollow integral outer tip with an opening extending there into, rivets securing said plates in assembled relation, cover sections over said rivets and extending through said openings into said tip portions to assist in holding the covers over said plates, one of said rivets being hollow, said covers being provided with projections to extend into said hollow rivet from opposite sides thereof and said projections being secured together.

11. The method of forming a backing plate for a tip knife which consists of providing a metal iblank, splitting the stock adjacent the ends thereof and raising the portions of the plate extending from the splits to the end extremity of the plate to form a pair of hollow integral outer tips.

ANTONIO PAOLANTONIO.

colonial-patentus2264453-0

 

 

These are pictures of some of my Colonial tip knives.

This is an old one made between 1926 and 1938.

colonial-arched-tangstamp-tip-knife-white

A Kinney shoes tip knife from the 1950s.

Colonial Kinney shoes 1 X

The Model 826 by Colonial was also a tip knife. This was a very popular knife due to all its use for the novelty character knives like Roy Rogers, Davy Crockett and many others.

colonial-davey-crocket-1-xcolonial-roy-rogers-1

More Colonial tip knives.

Colonial 7 Jack Knives X

Even this old Forest Master made between 1926 and 1938 is a tip knife.

Colonial Forest Master 13 X

17. The Roy Rogers Knife

Colonial made some fun western knives in the 1950s. One of them is the Roy Rogers knife.Its a model #826  with 2 blades. A main knife blade and a second blade that is a bottle opener and screwdriver. There is a clear front with a picture inside of Roy Rogers on Trigger. It says Roy Rogers and Trigger. The back is black plastic.

Below is  a picture of my Roy Rogers knife.

colonial-roy-rogers-1

Next is the contract between Colonial and the Rohr Company allowing Colonial license to make the Roy Rogers knife. The letter is dated May 10, 1950.

royrogersletter-full-x

Next is an advertisement for The Official Roy Rogers Knife.

roy-rogers-ad-2

 

 

Below is the Roy Rogers knife card. This is how they were sold in stores. There would have been about 12 of the Roy Rogers knives hanging on the card.

 

 

roy-rodgers-knife-card

16. Featured Collector Ed Beauregard

Here is a great collection of Colonials that belong to my friend Ed.

Ed is a man that knows what he likes and I really admire this collection.

His collection consists mostly of Barlow’s and electrician’s. He likes advertising knives which I think are such fun knives to due all the variety and history involved.

The pictures below shows an amazing assortment of old Colonials.

 

All pictures courtesy of Ed Beauregard ( edbeau at Bladeforums.com)

Colonial Box Barlows X

 

 

Colonial Box Barlows 2 X

 

Colonial Barlows 1 X

 

 

 

 

The 2 Barlow’s below are highly collectable.  They are salesman’s samples.

Salesmen would show these to someone interested in placing an advertising order so they would see what they were getting. The electrician blade in the Barlow is pretty interesting too.

 

Colonial Salesmans samples X

 

Here is a Dole advertising knife. Dole was one of Colonials biggest advertising knife customers.

 

Colonial Dole knife X

 

Colonial Dole knife2 X